Overview of the Alexander Technique


    The Alexander Technique addresses how we use ourselves as we perform
    the many different activities of our lives. During the first couple of years
    of life we used ourselves beautifully.
    This photograph (from Michael Gelb's
    excellent introductory book
    Body Learning) is a nice illustration of the
    natural integrity of the head,
    neck and back that we had as young children.

    As we continue through life most of us acquire a variety of habits of misuse:
    habits of tension that interfere with the good use with which we started. Some
    of these habits originate in the unconscious imitation of the posture, carriage
    and movement of others around us.  Others involve unnecessary tension
    associated with the response to the many forms of stimuli encountered daily:
    tensing the neck and back when rushing, tightening arms and shoulders while
    driving or working at the computer, etc.

    Poor posture and pain in the neck, back and shoulders often result from the
    cumulative effect of these habitual patterns and a lack of awareness of how
    we're using ourselves as we're going about our lives.


    Lessons in the Alexander Technique provide the means to restore the good use
    with which we began our lives.  During a lesson the teacher instructs the pupil,
    both verbally and with gentle hands-on guidance, to learn how to perform such daily
    activities as standing, sitting, bending and walking with greater and greater ease,
    balance and poise.  With each lesson the pupil's awareness grows along with
    the ability to unlearn existing habits of tension and prevent the formation of new ones. 

Less is more
Just as most things function better and last longer if they're well cared for,
so do humans. 
By knowing how to perform the activities of personal and
professional life with appropriate effort and tension, people typically find that
they're able to do more with greater ease and less strain. 





 

Jill Geiger, AmSAT, STAT

teaching the Alexander Technique since 1990
Newton, MA

617 527 7373

jill@ATinstruction.com